Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate Students

Joel Affoon

Joel is in his fourth-year of Honours Music specializing in Music Cognition at McMaster University. He is working on the Tonal Attraction project in the Digital Music Lab, which he is very excited about. His primary instrument of study is Classical Piano but also enjoys playing Alto Saxophone in the McMaster University Concert Band. His interests are in how musicians and non-musicians perceive music. Joel is looking forward to working in the lab this year to contribute as much as he can!

Tonal attraction is the magnetism between two notes or chords. Modelling the perception of tonal attraction can help explain the musical experience without relying on theoretical descriptions.

Karen Chan

My name is Karen Chan and I’m a third-year Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behaviour student. I’m currently working on the Tonal Attraction project, which has been really interesting! I’ve been playing various instruments (piano, tenor sax, bass clarinet) throughout my entire life, and my life for music is what brought me to this lab. Asides from the lab, I really enjoy reading, sewing, and playing guitar hero (because I can’t play the guitar in real life).

Tonal attraction is the magnetism between two notes or chords. Modelling the perception of tonal attraction can help explain the musical experience without relying on theoretical descriptions.

Max Delle Grazie

My name is Max Delle Grazie. I’m a fourth-year Honours Music major currently working in the Digital Music Lab on the Tonal Attraction project. My main interests are playing trombone and music theory, but I enjoy the psychological side of music as well. I have been studying music either independently or through school for about 10 years now, and I am thoroughly enjoying it. I listen to a variety of genres of music, mostly classical and alternative. Most importantly, I am happy to be making contributions to the project.

Tonal attraction is the magnetism between two notes or chords. Modelling the perception of tonal attraction can help explain the musical experience without relying on theoretical descriptions.

Nicholas Socholotiuk

Nicholas is attending his third year at McMaster, pursuing a major in Honours Music specializing in Music Cognition. He is currently volunteering on the Tonal Attraction project in the Digital Music Lab. His primary instrument is flute, and hobbies include a passion for creative writing, poetry, astronomy and fine cheeses. He is very excited to be working in the lab and is looking forward to what the lab has planned.

Shoshana Furman

My name is Shoshana Furman and I’m a third year PNB music cognition student. I’m working here on the memory for musical key project! I love music, I play cello, trumpet, and piano, and am looking forward to learn more about the psychological phenomena that happen in our brains when we listen to music! I’m very excited to work with everyone in the digital music lab and can’t wait to see what interesting things we find here!

Melodies and rhythms help us remember a musical piece for much longer than we would remember a string of chords.

Does harmonic structure influence memory for musical sequences?

How does language influence memory for a nonadjacent musical key?

Swati Anant

My name is Swati Anant and I am a second year student in the Bachelor of Health Sciences program. I wanted to join this lab as a volunteer seeing as it combines my passion for music, specifically piano, with the focus of my major in Health Sciences! I’m interested the psychological aspect of music along with the health implications of music and other art forms. In my free time, I enjoy developing piano covers of popular songs as well as cooking!

Wendy Tang

My name is Wendy Tang, I am a third year Psychology, Neuroscience and Behavior student. I am hoping to also pursue a minor in Music. I am currently working on the Music and Memory project! I love music, whether it’s listening to it or playing it. I have been involved in different bands (concert, jazz or chamber groups) ever since I was in grade 9. I play piano, tenor saxophone, french horn and also dabble around in a few other instruments. I am fascinated by how the brain responds to different stimuli and I am especially hoping to learn more about the different ways music affects our brain in the Digital Music Lab!

Melodies and rhythms help us remember a musical piece for much longer than we would remember a string of chords.

Does harmonic structure influence memory for musical sequences?

How does language influence memory for a nonadjacent musical key?

Evin Huang

Evin is a third-year student in Honours Arts & Science at McMaster University; she is honoured to have been granted a USRA for the summer. Her project involves studying the effects of prior knowledge of intricate musical systems on melodic conformity. When she is not working or studying, you can often find her practicing the violin or out on a walk with her DSLR – all with an iced coffee in hand. She is very excited to be working with the Digital Music Lab!

Does prior knowledge of intricate musical systems influence our expectations of melodic conformity?